Intergenerational influences on physical activity

Despite the recognised public health and economic benefits of regular physical activity, a significant proportion of the UK population remains irregularly active or sedentary. This project addresses the ESRC’s strategic priority under wellbeing of ‘influencing behaviour and informing interventions’. We will investigate the influence of work and family status on exercise and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adult life, taking account intersections with Socio-Economic Position and gender.

Research questions

  1. What is the role of employment status, working hours and commuting time in determining trajectories of physical activity and sedentary behaviour?
  2. Is there a particular life course stage at which changes in physical activity are most likely to occur? Which factors facilitate change? 
  3. What is the role of changes in family status and structure across the life course on trajectories of physical activity?

The project will use data from the 1958 National Child Development Study (NCDS), 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). It will investigate the influence of work and family status on exercise and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adult life, taking account intersections with Socio-Economic Position and gender. The project will utilise a mixture of modelling to identify physical activity longitudinal typologies in order to quantify change and stability over the life course.

Publications

Bann, D., Hamer, M., Parsons, S., Ploubidis, G., Sullivan, A. (2016) Does an elite education benefit health? Findings from the 1970 British Cohort Study. International Journal of Epidemiology (online first May 10, 2016).

       
Dates:

June 1, 2016 – November 30, 2017

Project Team:

George Ploubidis (Lead)

Alice Sullivan (Co-I CLS)

David Bann (CLS)

Mark Hamer (Loughborough)

Benedetta Pongiglione (CLS)