Briefings and case studies

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Child poverty in the first five years of life (MCS briefing 3)

Author:   Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description:  

This Briefing explores poverty in MCS families when the cohort child was aged 5. It also traces changes in families’ circumstances between the first survey, conducted when the child was 9 months old (MCS1), and the third survey at age 5 (MCS3).

Date published:   01/04/2010

Date posted:   01/04/2010

Childcare in the pre-school years (MCS briefing 8)

Author:   Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description:  

This briefing looks at the millennium children’s experience of care from people other than the mother, particularly in group childcare settings. It reports the findings of a study of 301 settings in England, compares the Millennium Cohort Study families who did and did not use centre-based care, and assesses the quality of care offered. It also describes the characteristics of centres providing high quality care as they may offer guidance for good practice. Finally, it discusses the study’s results in terms of government policy, and makes recommendations that could improve the quality of childcare.

Date published:   01/04/2010

Date posted:   01/04/2010

Childhood overweight and obesity (MCS briefing 14)

Author:   Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description:  

Data from the UK-wide Millennium Cohort Study provide the ideal opportunity to examine the development of obesity and its consequences from a very young age. This briefing provides an analysis of the weight and height data obtained when cohort members were aged 3 and 5. It also reports on the prevalence of obesity and overweight at these ages, examines stability and change between these ages, and identifies risk factors.

Date published:   01/04/2010

Date posted:   01/04/2010

Ethnic inequalities in child outcomes (MCS briefing 12)

Author:   Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description:  

This briefing reports findings from the Millennium Cohort Study on the nature and extent of ethnic differences in early childhood outcomes up to age 5.2 It considers background factors that are likely to have affected child outcomes. It looks at differences in socio-economic status and family characteristics, such as parental education and health, and also the home learning environment and parenting styles and rules.

Date published:   01/04/2010

Date posted:   01/04/2010

Ethnicity and social capital among mothers (MCS briefing 2)

Author:   Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description:  

This briefing focuses on Millennium Cohort Study families’ social resources, as reported by the mothers. Their social and support networks, and experiences of their local areas, will be relevant to their children as they grow up. We look at this issue through the lens of the mother’s ethnicity because social capital is seen as particularly important for minority ethnic groups.

Date published:   01/04/2010

Date posted:   01/04/2010

Impact case study: British birth cohort studies

Author:   David Budge

Description:  

This case study looks at the impact that the 1958, 1970 and millennium cohort studies have had on different areas of policy. Britain’s internationally-renowned birth cohort studies have been described as the “crown jewels of social research”. Because they track the same groups of people from birth, these studies show how histories of health, wealth, education, family and employment are interwoven for individuals and affect outcomes and achievements in later life. By comparing different generations in three cohorts, it is possible to chart social change and start to untangle the reasons behind it.

Date published:   01/07/2010

Date posted:   01/07/2010

Impact case study: Child Trust Fund scheme

Author:   David Budge

Description:  

This case study focuses on research (using data from the 1958 National Child Development Study) that played a pivotal role in the establishment of the last Labour government’s Child Trust Fund, the world’s first universal children’s savings scheme. The fund is a long-term tax-free savings initiative for UK children born between September 1, 2002 and January 2, 2011. Its designers aimed to ensure that every young person had some savings at the age of 18. They also hoped to encourage children to become savers and gain an understanding of personal finance.

Date published:   01/11/2011

Date posted:   01/11/2011

Impact case study: Millennium Cohort Study

Author:   David Budge

Description:  

This case study looks at the impact of the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) on policy and practice. The MCS is the first birth cohort study to include all four UK countries. Its field of enquiry covers such diverse topics as parenting; childcare; school choice; child behaviour and cognitive development; child and parental health; parents’ employment and education; income and poverty; housing, neighbourhood and residential mobility; social capital and ethnicity, and the growing fluidity of family structures. The study is providing an invaluable service to the research community in the UK and internationally, and has helped to influence social, education and health policy at local and national levels.

Date published:   01/11/2011

Date posted:   01/11/2011

Impact case study: Reading for pleasure

Author:   David Budge

Description:  

A 2013 research paper by two academics at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies on the beneficial effects of reading for pleasure in childhood has attracted a remarkable amount of interest from schools, libraries and literacy organisations around the world. This case study shows how the findings have been used to help protect library services, to persuade children of all ages to spend more time reading, and to encourage parents to support schools’ home reading initiatives.

Date published:   05/03/2015

Date posted:   05/03/2015

Impact case study: The impact of adult literacy and numeracy research based on the 1970 British Cohort Study

Author:   David Budge

Description:  

Research by Professor John Bynner and Dr Sam Parsons of the Institute of Education, University of London, has highlighted the hardships experienced by many adults with the lowest levels of literacy and numeracy. This case study on the impact of their work (see link below) demonstrates how their analyses of CLS birth cohort study datasets have helped to shape the thinking of UK policy-makers, educationists and health officials. It also documents their influence on overseas governments, international organisations, business and skills bodies, local authorities and charities.

Date published:   18/06/2014

Date posted:   18/06/2014